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Category: Medical Cleaning

Commercial Cleaning Services in Taylor, MI

The Difference Between Sanitizing and Disinfecting

In the cleaning industry, there are many misunderstandings about disinfectants and sanitizers. The terms are frequently interchanged in discussions, as many people believe they have the same meaning. Though they are similar, there are differences between sanitizing and disinfecting.

A sanitizer is a chemical that reduces the number of microorganisms to a safe level. It doesn’t need to eliminate 100 percent of all organisms to be effective.Sanitizing a surface makes that surface sanitary or free of visible dirt contaminants that could affect your health. Sanitizing is meant to reduce, not kill, the occurrence and growth of bacteria, viruses and fungi. Disinfecting a surface will “kill” the microscopic organisms as claimed on the label of a particular product.

A disinfectant is a chemical that completely destroys all organisms listed on its label. The organisms it kills are disease-causing bacteria and pathogens, and it may or may not kill viruses and fungi. From a legal standpoint (U.S Environmental Protection Agency guidelines), disinfectants must reduce the level of pathogenic bacteria by 99.999 percent during a time frame greater than 5 minutes but less than 10 minutes.

Practical Example

If we start with 1 million organisms on a surface then a disinfectant must kill 100 percent of them; zero left. A sanitizer only reduces the number of organisms down to 1,000 and does nothing about virus and fungus.

Sanitizers are typically involved with the cleaning of food-service areas. Disinfectants are typically involved with the cleaning of medical facilities.

 

source: www.issa.com ; www.cleanlink.com

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Janitorial Services in Plymouth, MI

Quiz: Understanding Hospital-Acquired Infections

During the 1830s, hospitalism was a term used to identify a growing problem in hospitals throughout northern Europe. It referred to diseases contracted by patients because of their stay in a hospital. Health officials at that time believed hospitalism was caused by poor ventilation; few believed in germs or cross contamination. Today, hospitalism is known as nosocomial or hospital-associated (or -acquired) infections (HAIs). We now know that along with other measures, hygienic cleaning can help prevent these illnesses.

The following short quiz is designed to test your knowledge of HAIs. After all, the more cleaning we know about HAIs, the better we will be able to prevent them. Take the test and then check your answers below:

  1. About how many people acquire HAIs in the U.S. each year?
    1. 100,000
    2. 500,000
    3. 1 million
    4. 2 million
  2. What are the total costs of treating HAI patients each year in the U.S.?
    1. Less than US$3 billion
    2. About $3 billion
    3. About $4 billion
    4. More than $4 billion
  3. What is the number of extra days a patient typically stays in a hospital as a result of an HAI?
    1. Five
    2. 10
    3. 20
    4. More than 20
  4. What is the average number of patients that die each year in the U.S. due to HAIs?
    1. 5,000
    2. 10,000
    3. 20,000
    4. 30,000
    5. More than 50,000
  5. Where are HAIs ranked among causes of death in the U.S.?
    1. 10th
    2. 12th
    3. Fourth
    4. Fifth
  6. What percentages of HAI cases are preventable?
    1. All
    2. 70 percent
    3. 50 percent
    4. About 30 percent

Answers:

  1. D
  2. D
  3. C
  4. E
  5. C
  6. B

 

source: www.issa.com

Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

Janitorial Services in Bloomfield Hills, MI

Cleaning for Health

If there is one expression that has become the motto, if not the marching orders, of today’s professional cleaning industry, it is “cleaning for health.” This all-important phrase was likely first coined by Dr. Michael Berry in his precedent-setting book, Protecting the Built Environment: Cleaning for Health. Since then, this concept has become powerful and significant—and rightly so.

Clean Evolution

At one time, our main purpose was to clean for appearance. But after Berry’s book was published, our industry was forced to reevaluate its primary function. We have now realized that our work and what we do for our end-customers is far more meaningful than just keeping floors shiny, counters wiped off, and carpets vacuumed. What we do helps keep people healthy.

While these changes were taking place, cleaning was also moving toward center stage in our industry. Cleaning to protect human health means reducing the negative impact cleaning can have on the health of cleaning workers and building occupants as well as protecting the environment. After all, what’s the point of having clean, sterile surfaces if people get sick because of the cleaning products used?

Around this same time, frightening public health scares, such as SARS, norovirus, MRSA, and other diseases, became prominent in headlines and news coverage throughout the world. Doctors and public health professionals were unable to stop the spread of these diseases and infections with vaccines or medications. Instead, cleaning professionals were called upon to provide health-based solutions aimed toward minimizing outbreaks and cross-contamination. In fact, one presenter at a Cleaning Industry Research Institute—CIRI—event even suggested that due to the connections between cleaning and health, the professional cleaning industry should be placed under the umbrella of the health care industry.

The link between cleaning and protecting human health is now a well-established part of the cleaning industry, lifting both our industry’s image and confidence and giving cleaning professionals a definite role and purpose beyond just tidying up facilities. However, this new role has also caused us to face a serious dilemma. How can we tell if we are cleaning to protect human health? As we all know, appearances can be deceiving when it comes to cleanliness. Fortunately, evolving methodologies can prove that visually clean surfaces are safe, healthy, and hygienically clean.

 

source: www.issa.com

Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

Commercial Cleaning in Troy, MI

A Word on Mats

 

To help keep floors cleaner for longer one of the first things that need to be checked are the mats to make sure they they are a help and not a hindrance.

Matting is one of the major things to keep floors cleaner for longer. Matting is key but throwing a three by five mat at an entrance way is not going to get enough dirt off people’s shoes. It is important to focus on both indoor and outdoor matting and ensure that they have the right type of mats, as well as the right size mats to effectively prevent soil from entering the building.

It all begins at the entrance of the facility. With a vast majority of debris in a building coming in through the entrances, proper matting is the first line of defense to keeping much of the dirt from being tracked further into the building. Proper matting can eliminate up to 90% of dirt and debris from entering the building.

Using effective bi-level scrapping mats in conjunction with wiper mats at minimum distances of 15 to 20 feet greatly reduces that dirt and debris, allowing for less wear and tear of the floor surface.

Mats, like floors need to be maintained well. They need to be kept clean and vacuumed. A lot of times you’ll see mats that are worn out and or neglected. This will cause an increase in the dirt inside the building.

 

Source: Contracting Profits Magazine Apr 2013
Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

Janitorial Services in Canton, MI

How to Care for Rubber Floors

Many facilities—especially schools and institutional buildings—are now installing what are termed sustainable hard-surface floor coverings made from bamboo, cork, certified or reclaimed hardwood, or engineered flooring (derived from wood chips and other materials). These properties tend to be large, busy, and multi-use buildings, and it is often difficult to find one type of sustainable floor that meets a facility’s diverse needs. Further, just as with other types of floor coverings, some sustainable floors are more durable, easier to clean and maintain, more slip-resistant, and more visually pleasing than others.

As summer approaches, one sustainable floor type deserves special consideration. Rubber flooring is finding more acceptance and being installed in more facilities, indoors as well as outside. This type of flooring is becoming more popular in schools, institutions, gyms, and pool areas thanks to the way it holds up in all types of situations including heat, humidity, and wet conditions. Rubber floors are now offered in a variety of designs and colors for all types of locations, and high-quality rubber floors often are easier to maintain, are more durable, and last longer than many other floor types—sustainable or conventional.

What makes rubber floors sustainable depends on how they are manufactured. Some rubber floors are made from renewable natural rubber extracted from rubber trees. The floors may also contain fillers, supplements, and coloring derived from other sustainable sources. Additionally, recycled rubber flooring typically is made from old tires and other rubber products, helping to minimize the amount of rubber that ends up in landfills.

Another factor that makes rubber a sustainable floor covering is life-cycle cost. A study by Sue Tartaglio of the International Interior Design Association compared a dozen frequently used synthetic and natural flooring products and found that rubber is the most cost-competitive resilient floor option. Tartaglio’s study took into consideration the initial purchase price, the cost of installation, and the costs of cleaning and maintenance over a 15-year period. In addition, the life cycle of most rubber floors is about 30 years, which adds to their long-term value. Depending on how the flooring is manufactured, rubber flooring tends to have lower volatile organic compound— or VOC—emissions than many other types of floors. This helps protect indoor air quality, which is of prime concern especially in schools and institutional facilities.

Cleaning and Care

Even with all their benefits, maintaining rubber flooring may be more complicated than originally believed. And with summer around the corner, the biggest season of the year for all types of restorative floor care, now is the perfect time to discuss how to effectively clean and maintain rubber floors.

Dust mopping typically is not advised for daily cleaning of rubber floors because they are often studded. And while the studded design of rubber floors serves an important purpose—helping to prevent slips, trips, and falls—the drawback is that moisture and soils can build up around the studs. A backpack vacuum cleaner can remove dry dust and soils surrounding the studs that a dust mop might not be able to remove. This is also more protective of indoor air quality, as no dust is stirred up into the air, and a HEPA-filter backpack will keep dust and contaminants from being released as well.

For more restorative cleaning, rubber floors are best cleaned with what are referred to as hard-surface tools. These are wands that are often used in conjunction with dual-surface carpet extractors to generate considerable pressure per square inch and remove soils. The dislodged dirt can then be vacuumed up, leaving the rubber flooring clean, dry, and ready for foot traffic.

You may consider using cleaning solutions for these hard-surface tools for even stronger cleaning power. In most cases, a neutral cleaner is all that is necessary, and several are green-certified. However, if the floor is installed around a pool, locker room, health care facility, or other location where there are increased concerns about bacteria, a sanitizer or disinfectant can be used. Be sure to read label instructions regarding dilution and dwell time, and check that the chemical is safe for rubber floors. An astute distributor should be able to provide valuable guidance in this regard.

With new colors, innovative designs, and the fact that many types are now considered both green and sustainable, cleaning professionals can expect to see more rubber floors in all types of facilities. Cleaned and maintained properly, a rubber floor can prove to be a high-quality, good-looking investment welcomed in all types of properties for many years to come.

 

source: www.issa.com

Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

 

Janitorial Services in Detroit, MI

Preventing Infections in Health Care Facilities

  Health care-associated infections (HAIs) continue to plague facilities in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that one out of every 20 patients will become infected with an HAI. [1]

  Two of the most troublesome HAIs that health care facilities face include norovirus, a pathogen that causes gastroenteritis and food poisoning, and Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), a spore-forming bacterium that causes symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. These infections spread rapidly through populations and can cost facilities thousands of additional dollars to contain. However, there are prevention mechanisms and protocols available to help minimize outbreaks.

  HAI prevention should be a priority for health care staff working in all types of facilities including hospitals, outpatient, and long-term care facilities. Prevention is not only in the best interest of the patients, but health care staff as well.


  PROimage Facility Services Cleaning staff are knowledgeable about proper hand hygiene protocols, personal protective equipment (PPE) use, disease transmission, and cleaning and disinfection procedures for HAIs. Training and educating staff on these issues is a priority.


  The following tips and recommendations on how to prevent and manage C. difficile and norovirus outbreaks help to serve as a great primer on the importance of infection prevention and environmental surface disinfection in health care facilities. The important thing for health care cleaning staff to remember is that the standard activities of cleaning, selecting appropriate disinfectants, and monitoring practices all contribute to a safer, healthier patient environment.

C. difficile (Clostridium difficile)

  According to a recent CDC Vital Signs Report, C. difficile infections are at an all-time high and are linked to 14,000 deaths in the United States each year. A stronger germ strain also contributed to a 400 percent increase in C. difficile-related deaths between 2000 and 2007. [2]

  C. difficile can infect anyone, but older adults and those on antibiotics are most at risk. C. difficile spores are resilient and can survive on surfaces for months, allowing them to easily spread to others through contact with contaminated surfaces or health care workers’ hands.

  To help reduce the spread of C. difficile infections, each facility should have protocols in place that outline cleaning and disinfecting practices, recommended U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered products to use, and assigned roles for personnel. Always use disinfecting products that are EPA-registered to kill C. difficile and follow the label instructions to keep the surface wet for the recommended amount of time.

The CDC also has six key steps to prevention, which are listed below.

CDC’s Six Steps to C. difficile Prevention [3]

  1. Prescribe and use antibiotics carefully. About 50 percent of all antibiotics given are not needed, unnecessarily raising the risk of C. difficile infections.

  2. Test for C. difficile when patients have diarrhea while on antibiotics or within several months of taking them.

  3. Isolate patients with C. difficile immediately.

  4. Wear gloves and gowns when treating patients with C. difficile, even during short visits. Hand sanitizer does not kill C. difficile, and hand washing may not be sufficient.

  5. Clean room surfaces with an approved, spore-killing disinfectant after a patient with C. difficile has been treated there.

  6. When a patient transfers, notify the new facility if the patient has a C. difficile infection.


Norovirus

  Recent study statistics from the February 2012 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control show that norovirus is the leading cause of HAI outbreaks. Norovirus is responsible for 18.2 percent of all infection outbreaks and 65 percent of ward closures in United States hospitals.

  Like C. difficile, norovirus is highly contagious, causes diarrhea in patients, and is transmitted to others through touching infected surfaces, eating contaminated food, or by having direct contact with a contaminated individual. Norovirus outbreaks are especially difficult to contain and control once a health care facility is contaminated.

  Maintaining a proactive disinfecting protocol against norovirus is extremely important for all health care facilities. Cleaning staff should work with their infection control departments to determine appropriate disinfecting and monitoring procedures that are best suited to their facility. Health care cleaning staff should be advised to use the proper protective equipment (gown and gloves), use EPA-registered disinfectants with a label claim to kill norovirus, and clean rooms and high-touch surface areas more frequently during a suspected norovirus outbreak. Follow the product manufacturer’s instructions and pay attention to how long a product needs to remain wet on a surface to kill norovirus.

The CDC also recommends the following procedures for prevention and disinfection against norovirus.


CDC Norovirus Prevention Tips [4,5]

Patients with suspected norovirus may be placed in private rooms or share rooms with other patients with the same infection.

  1. Follow hand-hygiene guidelines and carefully wash hands with soap and water after contact with patients with norovirus infection.
  2. Use gowns and gloves when in contact with or caring for patients who are symptomatic with norovirus.
  3. Routinely clean and disinfect high-touch patient surfaces and equipment with an EPA-approved product with a label claim for norovirus.
  4. Increase the frequency of cleaning and disinfection of patient care areas and frequently touched surfaces during outbreaks of norovirus gastroenteritis (e.g., increase ward/unit level cleaning twice daily to maintain cleanliness, with frequently touched surfaces cleaned and disinfected three times daily using EPA-approved products for health care settings).
  5. Frequently touched surfaces include—but are not limited to—commodes, toilets, faucets, hand/bed railing, telephones, door handles, computer equipment, and kitchen preparation surfaces.
  6. Remove and wash contaminated clothing or linens.
  7. Exclude health care workers who have symptoms consistent with norovirus from work.


source: http://www.issa.com

[1] CDC. Healthcare-associated infections: The Burden. Retrieved from:http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/burden.html.

[2] CDC. March 2012. Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer: Retrieved from:http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/hai.

[3] CDC. March 2012. Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer. Retrieved from:http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/hai/.

[4] CDC. Key Infection Control Recommendations for the Control of Norovirus Outbreaks in Healthcare Settings. Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/hai/pdfs/norovirus/229110A-NorovirusControlRecomm508A.pdf.

[5] CDC. Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs): Norovirus in Healthcare Facilities. Retrieved from:http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/organisms/norovirus.html#a5


Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

Janitorial Services in Warren, MI

Cleaning for Health

Looking into the future, we can expect to see an increased interest in cleaning for health. This growing interest is partially due to the widespread acceptance of green cleaning. The adoption and use of green cleaning products and services has renewed the awareness and appreciation of the primary purpose of cleaning—i.e., to remove unwanted matter and pathogenic microorganisms from facilities to ensure they are in a state conducive to the occupants’ health and well being. The growing interest in cleaning for health is also borne out of greater awareness and an increase in the transmission and prevalence of infectious pathogens that threaten human health, such as MRSA and the norovirus. Cleaning, of course, plays a crucial role in breaking the “infection connection” and protecting human health.

Today, we have devices like Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) testers that can scientifically measure the effectiveness of a cleaning process. ATP testers are becoming more common in the marketplace because they are relatively inexpensive and provide almost instantaneous results. These devices play an important role in not only measuring effectiveness, but also in improving cleaning processes.

In fact, ISSA and the Cleaning Industry Research Institute are collaborating on a three year research project using ATP testers to establish a uniform, scientific measure of clean from a public health perspective so that when a facility is declared “clean” it means that it is healthy and sanitary for the occupants’ welfare. When completed, the findings will have the most relevance in a K-12 educational setting, but it is expected that the results will be readily transferable to most institutional settings. The research is also expected to prove the positive connection between a clean and healthy school building and student performance.

source: www.issa.com

Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

Janitorial Services in Commerce, MI

Carpets, Health, and Air Quality

There have been a number of surprising studies throughout the years regarding the amount of germs and bacteria that can be found on office desks, cell phones, and the sponges we use to wipe down counters and wash dishes. However, one study that has gotten relatively little notice relates to carpets and concerns about indoor air quality (IAQ).

  In that study, which was conducted by the University of Arizona several years ago, researchers asked a group of people to wear brand-new shoes for two weeks. They were to wear the shoes everywhere—to school, to work, shopping, etc. After two weeks, the shoes were returned to be tested for contaminants that might have collected on the shoe bottoms. What researchers discovered surpassed their expectations:

  • The shoes collected more than 420,000 units of bacteria, and all the shoes had varying amounts of bacteria on them.

  • Potentially hazardous levels of E. coli were present on about one-third of the shoes.

  • Greywater, food, drinks, grease, tar, and dust were found on all of the shoes to varying degrees.


  These kinds of contaminants and bacteria all have the potential to negatively impact indoor air quality when they are walked into a facility on users’ shoes. However, in most cases, carpets act as an environmental filter, trapping soils, bacteria, and contaminants and stopping them from becoming airborne, which means healthier IAQ for everyone.

  But the effectiveness of carpeting as an environmental filter is dependent on maintenance. Carpets must be properly cleaned and maintained at regular intervals in order to protect IAQ. And this typically begins with the creation of an effective and sustainable carpet maintenance program.

Carpet Maintenance Program

  One of the first steps that must be taken before creating an effective carpet maintenance program is to study the amount of foot traffic and the number of people who generally use each carpeted area. This information will help determine the “soil rating” of the facility, which is the measure of the intensity of the soil load that can accumulate in the carpets. These ratings are designated as light, normal, moderate, heavy, or extreme. Soil ratings help determine the frequency of tasks such as vacuuming, interim carpet cleaning, and hot-water carpet extraction.

  For instance, a facility with a moderate soil rating should be vacuumed two to four times per week to remove dust, contaminants, and particulates from carpets. Additionally:

    • Spotting should be performed daily or as soon as spots are noticed.

    • Heavy traffic areas should be cleaned using either interim or restorative carpet cleaning methods every six months.

    • All carpets should be cleaned using hot-water carpet extraction at least once per year.


  Unfortunately, determining the soil rating of a facility and how frequently carpet cleaning tasks should be performed to help protect IAQ can be determined only on a case-by-case basis. “Facilities vary in traffic, soiling rates, and usage,” explains Heiferman. “Additionally, climate and the desired appearance level of the carpet are considerations that must be evaluated in order to build an effective maintenance program.”

The Importance of Carpet Extraction in Protecting Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

 Earlier we referenced the role of “interim” cleaning methods as part of an overall carpet maintenance program. Typically this refers to carpet cleaning methods that remove soils found on the top surfaces of the carpet. These include vacuuming as well as shampooing and bonnet cleaning methods. According to Mark Baxter, an engineer with U.S. Products, while these methods can be effective, the key thing to remember is that they are, as the name implies, only interim or short-term measures.

 “Interim methods can only do so much. In order for carpets to serve as a filter and protect IAQ, they must be thoroughly cleaned using restorative methods.”

 Baxter takes this a step further, advising that carpets should be cleaned using hot-water carpet extractors that heat the water or cleaning solution to more than 200°F. “[Heat] improves the effectiveness of cleaning chemicals so that less chemical may be necessary. This makes the entire carpet cleaning [process] greener and more sustainable and helps protect IAQ,” says Baxter.


Complete Carpet maintenance

  “A [successful] program [will be one] that addresses all of these cleaning and maintenance issues, beginning with the proper training of cleaning technicians, promotes sustainability and protects IAQ and the health of all building users,” says Baxter. “It also ensures that soils and contaminants are removed from carpets, which not only enhances their appearance but increases their longevity as well.”

Source: http://www.issa.com


Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

Turn up the Heat: Carpet Cleaning

Turn up the Heat: Carpet Cleaning

 Carpet cleaning is a science, and without proper training and education, one can easily make serious mistakes that can result in potentially irreparable damage to carpet. With so much at stake, it is important to understand the role of heat in the carpet cleaning process.

 Heat is one of the four fundamental components of cleaning along with agitation, time, and chemical action. Heat speeds up the molecular activity of chemicals so that they work harder to help remove soils. In fact, studies show that for every 18 degrees of temperature rise above 188°F, chemical action is increased by a factor of two.

Along with helping to break down and remove soils, heat has additional benefits:

    • Longer carpet life span. Embedded soils can eat away at carpet fibers along with the backing of the carpet, but more effective cleaning―the result of heat―can help remove these soils and enhance the life span of the carpet.

    • Easier grease and oil removal. Heated cleaning solution helps loosen and break down grease and oils so that they can be more easily removed from carpet fibers.

    • Improved appearance. Often the texture of the carpet is fluffed by the heated cleaning process, making the carpet look fuller and more luxurious.

    • Shorter drying times. Heat can speed up the drying process for carpets.

 Although heat can benefit the carpet cleaning process significantly, it can lose value at a certain point. Typically, heated solution of approximately 212°F at the wand tip is considered preferable. Too low a temperature can mean you are not maximizing the benefits of heat. Conversely, too high a temperature can result in vaporization, which can be detrimental to the cleaning process. The cleaning solution should always remain in a liquid form.

When Heat May Be a Detriment

While heat is an important player in effective cleaning, there are a few situations when heat should be avoided. Typically this depends on the type of fiber or fabric being cleaned or the type of soiling.

 For instance, if crayon or candle wax is in the carpet, high heat may cause the colors and dyes to run. Additionally, protein soiling, including soil from blood, eggs, and other foods, is typically best cleaned using cold water. With these soils, heated water can actually bake the proteins into the carpet, making them harder to remove. Such problems can be avoided by simply inspecting the carpet before cleaning.

 Fabrics such as wool and silk can present further complications. While rarely installed, especially in commercial facilities, wool carpet is usually best cleaned with warm―not hot―water. Many experts suggest 150°F is the maximum temperature to be safe, as excessive heat can damage the appearance of the wool. For its part, silk may shrink if it is cleaned with too high a temperature, and permanent texture damage also can result.

 Finally, certain dyes, no matter what the fiber or fabric, can lack colorfastness and may bleed if cleaned with high heat. If you are unsure as to whether the carpet to be cleaned is colorfast, test a small area before cleaning the entire carpet.

source: www.issa.com

Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.

A Word on Mats

A Word on Mats

To help keep floors cleaner for longer one of the first things that need to be checked are the mats to make sure they they are a help and not a hindrance.

Proper matting is one of the major things to keep floors cleaner for longer. Matting is key but throwing a three by five mat at an entrance way is not going to get enough dirt off people’s shoes. It is important to focus on both indoor and outdoor matting and ensure that they have the right type of mats, as well as the right size mats to effectively prevent soil from entering the building.

 It all begins at the entrance of the facility. With a vast majority of debris in a building coming in through the entrances, proper matting is the first line of defense to keeping much of the dirt from being tracked further into the building. Proper matting can eliminate up to 90% of dirt and debris from entering the building.

 Using effective bi-level scrapping mats in conjunction with wiper mats at minimum distances of 15 to 20 feet greatly reduces that dirt and debris, allowing for less wear and tear of the floor surface.

 Mats, like floors need to be maintained well. They need to be kept clean and vacuumed. A lot of times you’ll see mats that are worn out and or neglected. This will cause an increase in the dirt inside the building.

Source: Contracting Profits Magazine Apr 2013

Contact PROimage Facility Services at (313) 387-1977 today! Your Facility’s Professional Image Is Our Business.